News

November 5, 2012

CUNY has class despite no gas, limited mass transit service after Sandy

The Queens College campus was spared by hurricane Sandy leaving little damage. PHOTO BY ANDREA HARDALO.

BY ANDREA HARDALO

The phrase “the calm after the storm,” didn’t apply to many CUNY students who returned to classes on Friday, Nov. 2.

After canceling all classes from Oct. 29 through Nov. 1, CUNY decided to open the doors of its campuses Friday despite the nearly impossible commuting conditions that were still felt days after Hurricane Sandy’s wrath.

By the time students were supposed to return to school, transit problems weren’t completely fixed; many subways and buses ran on a limited schedule, some people were still without power in their homes and a gas shortage caused many people to wait on long lines.

But CUNY decided to resume classes nonetheless.

“I still have no power, so I couldn’t even find out for myself that I had class. I had to have someone else check the Queens College website and tell me there was class,” said freshman Nick Griffin on Friday. “In a nutshell, finding out about having class was very stressful.”

“I was upset because my biggest concern was how am I going to get to class. Do I have enough gas in my car, what buses am I going to take, how can I find a route that doesn’t have trees down or too much traffic,”

The Queens College campus was spared by hurricane Sandy leaving little damage. PHOTO BY ANDREA HARDALO.

Griffin added.

At time of press, CUNY and QC failed to offer a comment in regards to the decision to hold classes on Friday, despite requests.

Michael Levine, a junior and a commuter from Fresh Meadows, who either takes the Q17 or Q88 buses, said his 25-minute commute turned into a 40-minute commute with the long gas lines causing a lot of traffic on the Horace Harding Expressway.

Both Levine and Griffin said classes weren’t as full as they usually are but professors continued with their lessons.

With the exception of a destroyed tree near Powdermaker Hall, QC was fortunately left relatively unscathed after the storm. The school’s tennis bubble, which was destroyed during a tornado in 2010, remained intact. Other CUNY schools were hit devastatingly hard, including Hunter College which was flooded.

The shortage of gas in the city may still prevent students from attending class this week but mass transit service has steadily improved with the majority of it back in working condition.

Friday, a day when public schools were forced to remain closed, was a different story. QC is usually filled with plenty of students on campus, but Levine described the scene as a “ghost town.”

“The only time I’ve ever seen the campus as empty and barren as it was on Friday was when I walked across campus a few weeks ago at 7 a.m. on a Sunday for a school trip,” Levine said.

 

 

 

 



About the Author

Andrea Hardalo
Andrea Hardalo is an English and Journalism and BALA minor and the Communications Managing Editor with The Knight News. She is a NY Mets fan no matter what any one thinks and loves to watch or play sports. She also likes to bake yummy things. Her Journalism/career goals include a career in any field of journalism whether it be in writing or broadcasting. She has always wanted to work in a TV studio. Since she’s not sure which one she wants to do yet she hopes that with experience she’ll know which one she likes better. Currently she edits into late hours of the night, tweets ferociously and covers The Summit beat.




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