• Sports

    Queens College’s baseball stadium named after alum Charles Hennekens

    Charles Hennekens, a Queens College alum, was honored by the college at a ceremony on Oct. 17 with the baseball field named after him. After the unveiling of the new stadium sign, Hennekens threw the opening pitch for a baseball scrimmage. In the scientific community, Hennekens is knowing for saving more than 1.1 million lives by discovering aspirin can prevent heart attacks. Hennekens is both the first Sir Richard Doll Professor and an adviser at Florida Atlantic University. In addition, he received the Ochsner Award Relating Smoking and Health by the Ochsner Clinic Foundation last year for finding the risks of smoking tied to heart attacks. A Phi Beta Kappa…

  • Sports

    Men’s tennis reflects college’s vast diversity of students

    Queens College is known for its diverse culture on campus along with students from different nationalities and ethnicities. In fact, according to data analyst Randy Olson, Queens County, where QC is located in, is the third most diverse county in the U.S. and the most diverse if Alaska and Hawaii are not counted. Thus, it should come as no surprise the college’s sports teams reflect this diversity as they include a mix of individuals coming from a variety of cultural backgrounds. The men’s tennis team is one example of this with a diverse set of players. Four players on team hail from different places around the globe. Sophomores Federico Toscano…

  • Op-Eds

    Are Stricter Gun Laws Really The Answer?

    Are promoting stricter gun laws really the answer? Is this where the journey to saving lives truly begins? Or does it begin way before one steps into a store in a state that does not require you to hand over any information besides a “hey how ya doin’? I’d like to buy this gun” greeting? States with tighter gun control laws have fewer gun deaths, hence the title of the article. I am proposing that the issue of gun control in our country falls way deeper than merely altering its laws in our governmental policies. The 26-year-old who shot and killed at least nine people while injuring many others at…

  • Arts & Entertainment

    “Bridge of Spies” challenges patriotism amid hysteria

    “Bridge of Spies,” a film directed by Steven Spielberg, stays away from the darkness of the Cold War era and shows stooping to an enemy’s level betrays what it means to be American. Though this film is slightly weighed down with nostalgia, it still is entertaining. The film, based on a true story, begins in 1955, the height of Cold War hysteria between the United States and the Soviet Union. It starts off in the apartment of Rudolf Abel, played by Mark Rylance, a balding 50-year-old man with a permanent frown on his face. Abel lives alone, is a skilled painter and a Soviet spy. Abel receives a covert message…

  • Arts & Entertainment

    “Mosque Alert” focuses on Islamophobia in society

    Students joined actors on Oct. 16, for a participatory play called “Mosque Alert” at the Kupferberg Center. “Mosque Alert” is about the construction of a new mosque in Naperville, Ill, which led to conflicts between two families of different religions. The two families learn more about each other and eventually put their differences aside. The cast consisted of actors such as Noam Ash, star of YouTube’s “My Gay Roommate.” “The creation of these characters really grew out of a development process,” Jamil Khoury, the play writer, said. “We started looking into this broader issue of the resistance of building mosques across the US.” The play began with each character’s backgrounds and belief systems. Mostafa Khalil,…