• News

    Free printing gone after less than a year

    Queens College will no longer provide free printing for students at the Rosenthal Library, according to a recent announcement by Vice President for Student Affairs Adam Rockman. Starting last April, students were able to print for free at the Library, while other buildings still charged a fee for students. Before that program, students were allocated $15 on their Q-Cards to print on campus, after evaluating their professors online. Free printing was pushed for by Students for Change in conjunction with the Office for Converging Technologies to implement the program. At the time, former Student Association President Matthew Louie and his administration believed this would help students, yet warned not to…

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    Education and internships go hand-in-hand, poll says

    Twenty-nine percent of graduates say they held a job or an internship where they were able to apply skills learned from classes, according to a new poll from Gallup. The survey found recent graduates more likely to find the connection with 35 percent of students who graduated from 2010 to 2014 compared to 29 percent of graduates from 1960 to 1969. The Gallup poll highlighted, when the statistics were broken down, how 31 percent of women found their classroom experience helpful when interning compared to 27 percent of men. Furthermore, 32 percent of blacks applied the same lessons to their internships, the highest out of all ethnicities. Internships are set…

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    Witnessing the end of apartheid through a former diplomat’s eyes

    Former Greek ambassador Loucas Tsilas spoke at Godwin-Ternbach Museum in Klapper Hall on Nov. 12 to reflect on his time in South Africa during the end of apartheid. The lecture was a part of the Short Course on South Africa series, which coincides with the Year of South Africa at Queens College. Tsilas’ talk highlighted the historical lessons from the dark period in the country’s history. “It is so refreshing and thought-provoking to discuss these issues,” Tsilas said. In South Africa, apartheid, which divided society by race, was implemented in 1948 and dismantled in the beginning of the 1990s after pressure from international countries and resistance from inside the country.…

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    Conference looks ahead and draws lessons from Civil Rights Movement

    The Africana Studies Program and the National Congress of Black Women hosted a symposium reflecting on the Civil Rights Movement as well as ways for black youths to progress in terms of education on Oct. 23 at Rosenthal Library 230. The forum was broken up into two parts. The first half dealt with the issue of affirmative action and voting rights for African-Americans. The second segment focused on providing a unique program for black students. The event began with Evelyn Julmisse, the acting director of the Africana Studies Program, welcoming the audience. She introduced Don Capaldi, a community activist and the liason for Rep. Grace Meng (D-NY), who spoke on the…

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    Professors hope for a contract amid negotiations

    With New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio agreeing on new contracts with city unions, professors in CUNY wonder when they are able to work out an agreement. Since no progress was made under former Mayor Michael Bloomberg and his administration, professors and staff members are working based on the expired agreement. The last contract expired in 2010. The Professional Staff Congress, which represents all faculty and staff members throughout the university, has been in negotiations with the CUNY administration since the summer. Fran Clark, communications coordinator for the PSC, said negotiations were going well. “Our negotiation committee has expressed they’ve been productive. But, until CUNY can put money on…