• News

    OP-ED: How do we protect our children?

    Trigger Warning (for those parties sensitive to assault) By: Samantha Galvez-Montiel Long Island sports coach Sean Johnsen had inappropriate contact with a 16-year-old girl on August 17 and 21, according to Nassau County Police. He was charged with two counts of third-degree rape, two counts of the third-degree criminal sex act, and endangering the welfare of a child. Johnsen is set to be arraigned November 6th in Mineola. Bluntly speaking, Johnsen is a 35-year-old man that raped a young girl of 16-years-old. There’s the major question of what prompts people to do such a thing and we have to note that rape is a mostly man’s problem.   According to a…

  • News,  This Week's Paper,  World News

    The solution to narrow the digital divide is to reframe “Access”

    Schools in the 21st century are still being treated as money-making machines. As public schools in the U.S. become more and more diverse, inequities and injustices still exist within our schools, societies, and world. As technology advances, we believe that it is an important tool children should become accustomed to using at a young age. However, technological progress does not equal social progress. As we distribute technology, we are also contributing to inequities, as the methods by which teachers use said technology in the classroom varies. Essentially, not every child is going to receive a technological education up to par with others, especially if access to this technology is limited…

  • News,  Spotlight,  This Week's Paper,  World News

    Queens College Student Association instigates outrage in Jewish student community

    On October 14, 2020, a dramatic uproar rose from the QC Jewish community when students learned that social activist and notorious anti-Semite, Tamika Mallory, was a guest speaker at an event held by the Queens College Student Association (SA). The Knight News conducted a thorough investigation on the allegations at hand and spoke to local leaders in the QC Jewish community for their take on the matter.  According to the Washington Post, Mallory was asked to resign from the 2019 Women’s March over allegations of antisemitism, yet it is public speculation that her term had already expired prior to the request that she step down. Mallory’s controversy dates back to…

  • News,  Self-Empowerment,  This Week's Paper

    Mental Health Matters: What CUNY is doing to support its students

    As the COVID-19 global pandemic persists, CUNY students and other students nationwide continue to grapple with prevailing uncertainty, fear, anxiety and depression. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention defines mental health as our emotional, social and psychological well-being. Mental health has experienced a sharp overall decline as a result of the widespread effects of coronavirus. For students, as they continue to attend classes physically or via online platforms, the pandemic continues to affect mental health.  The City University of New York is a network of vast and expansive urban public universities; according to the CUNY website, the university system accounts for the largest such network in the country. CUNY…

  • News,  Op-Eds,  This Week's Paper,  World News

    OP-ED: Majors that are producing the smallest number of graduates and why

    As an undergrad, you will inevitably hear some STEM majors drone on about how difficult their major is. So, it begs the question, what makes their major so hard? And what is STEM? STEM majors encompass science, technology, and mathematics. More specifically, this umbrella term is inclusive of natural (biology, chemistry, physics), behavioral (neuroscience, psychology) ,and computer and information sciences. Some of the crucial benefits of majoring in chemistry or physics include training in critical thinking, learning, and analysis. There are a variety of possibilities for students with STEM degrees.   Here at Queens College, The Knight News caught up with Dr. Cherice Evans, an associate professor of chemistry, to enlighten…