• Op-Eds

    Improving Medicare’s Future

    On July 30, Medicare will celebrate its 51st anniversary. Before preparing the party and getting the cake, we must applaud the resilience and resourcefulness of the Medicare program for the past 51 years. Unfortunately, Medicare faces a financial problem that might result in changes to the program. The problem comes as the baby boomers retire and are living longer. There is ongoing fear that the government will run out of funding for Medicare, resulting in reduced money for current and future recipients. While funding is an issue, there is hope for the program. And that hope is called privatization. The current situation for the future Medicare. The Federal government have…

  • Op-Eds

    Saying goodbye is never simple

    After joining a newspaper four years ago with zero knowledge of journalism, I am confident to leave with an incredible depth of strategies and lessons from my teachers, colleagues and friends. I can remember Welcome Day in 2012. I finished four years of speech and debate in high school where I grew from a shy, reserved person to one of the best debaters in New York State. I even assumed leadership for two years. I felt eager to try something new and see how I could go. Out of all the clubs, just two caught my attention. One was a political group, the other was The Knight News. I read…

  • Op-Eds

    College is Back In Session; Will New Yorkers Get a Break?

    With colleges back in session, many students and their families are wondering if they will get a break on rising college costs.  American higher education has seen a dramatic shift in who pays for public college.  America was once a society that valued college education and put its collective money where its mouth is by funding the bulk of the cost of that education. But since the 1980s, there has been a shift in the burden of paying for public college from government to the families of those in college.  The clearest evidence of that shift has been the reduction state dollars going to public colleges and the dramatic increase…

  • Op-Eds

    Opportunity for all, what students need to know to demand equal rights

    The students of Queens College must keep the fire of social justice shining for the future, through activism and knowledge that helps underrepresented groups resist policies that can demean the right to education and economic stability. QC represents the most ethnically and religiously diverse urban area in the world, according to USA Today. This means that the college must fight for the rights of all, as it did during the Freedom Rides of 1964, to show that the murders of Andrew Goodman, a QC anthropology student, Michael Schwerner, a social worker from Manhattan’s Lower East Side and James Chaney, a local Mississippi plasterer’s apprentice, were not in vain. In a…

  • Op-Eds

    Judgment day for the undocumented

    Sofia, a student at QC, is safe for two years, but her family isn’t. Sofia is a 21-year-old undocumented immigrant. She asked that her real name not be used, so I came up with Sofia. Sofia, is safe after signing up for deferred action — a program allowing undocumented students to stay in the U.S. for two years without worry. She came to the U.S. from Ecuador when she was nine. She and her mother each had month-long travel visas, but never left once they expired. In the last month, my mother and I sat in synagogue for Rosh Hashanah — the Jewish New Year and Yom Kippur — the…