• Racial Justice Guide,  This Week's Paper,  World News

    Living in Color: ’People of Color’ a phrase divided

    The minimization of the minority has been a common trait of our society for centuries and has evolved over time in many different ways. Yet no matter how drastic the change, the oppression faced by minorities has continued to constrain any progress that could come. With the rise of Black Lives Matter movement, many are questioning whether or not the phrase ‘people of color’, often abbreviated as POC, is appropriate in this day and age. Some contend that the phrase undermines the struggles that certain minority communities face, in contrast to others. From the beginning, people have been stripped of their rights and identities, seen only as the lesser kind…

  • News

    The Moynihan Report still controversial 50 years later

    The Department of Labor published a report in 1965 titled “The Negro Family: The Case for National Action,” commonly known as the Moynihan Report, named after Daniel Patrick Moynihan, the author. The report condemned the disintegration of the family structure within the poor, black community. It was criticized for “blaming the victim” instead of targeting systematic racism and other societal factors. However, the report became controversial within the black community who, at the time, fought for equal treatment under the law. Still, its legacy remains as supporters refer to it even 50 years after its publication. Stephen Steinberg, a Queens College professor, examined the report’s legacy 50 years after its…

  • News

    Report finds higher education does not protect Hispanic and black wealth

    A college degree does not protect the wealth of all racial and ethnic groups equally, a recent St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank research report found. The study was based on the data from the 2013 Survey of Consumer Finances report. The study reported families with a college graduate as its primary financial supporter earn 2.4 times more than families without a college graduate. It also found during bad economic situations, for example the recent recession, higher education protects only a select group of people, particularly whites and Asians, while Hispanics and blacks fared worse. Interestingly, black and Hispanic families headed by non-college graduates did better than their counterparts with a…

  • News

    Conference looks ahead and draws lessons from Civil Rights Movement

    The Africana Studies Program and the National Congress of Black Women hosted a symposium reflecting on the Civil Rights Movement as well as ways for black youths to progress in terms of education on Oct. 23 at Rosenthal Library 230. The forum was broken up into two parts. The first half dealt with the issue of affirmative action and voting rights for African-Americans. The second segment focused on providing a unique program for black students. The event began with Evelyn Julmisse, the acting director of the Africana Studies Program, welcoming the audience. She introduced Don Capaldi, a community activist and the liason for Rep. Grace Meng (D-NY), who spoke on the…