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    New York Times journalist speaks about ‘stop and frisk’

    Jim Dwyer, a journalist with The New York Times, spoke in front of an audience of 45 people about “stop and frisk” on April 15. Dwyer joined The New York Times in 2001 following a career where he won two Pulitzer Prizes, prestigious awards given to journalists, and wrote six books. Dwyer stated that 700,000 individuals were stopped and frisked in 2012, with 3 percent of those arrests ending in conviction based on possessing and openly using marijuana. Generally, either black or Hispanic men under 25 were arrested, despite, as Dwyer noted, whites using marijuana at higher rates. Dwyer then showed video clips exemplifying police misconduct. The first video explained…

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    CUNY professor debates stop and frisk policy

    New York City’s stop and frisk program is considered by many to be inherently problematic and racist. According to data by the New York Civil Liberties Union, 532,911 people were stopped in 2012, of which 87 percent were black and Latino. The program has come under fire from minorities, civil rights groups and academics, including CUNY professors. In July, John Jay College professors Delores Jones-Brown and Brett Stoudt launched stopandfriskinfo.org, a website containing articles, videos and reports that provide information on stop and frisk policies. The site is the collaborative effort of John Jay’s Center on Race, Crime and Justice, Communities United for Police Reform and the Marijuana Arrest Research…

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    As Stop and Frisk Trial Continues, New Report Details Impact of Marijuana Arrests

    “Bogus.” Bogus is the word the New York Police Department used in response to the numerous studies and reports that Queens College sociologist Harry Levine has made. His recent report, “One Million Police Hours: Making 440,000 Marijuana Possession Arrests in New York City, 2002-2012,”  details how much time and energy is invested by the NYPD on marijuana arrests. These numbers include the costs of the controversial stop and frisk policy. The report, which indicates that more than one million police hours have been invested into marijuana arrests, comes as Floyd v. City of New York examines the legality of stop and frisk. This is “the equivalent of having 31 police…