• News,  This Week's Paper

    Participatory budgeting gets students involved with how their tuition money is spent

    The Participatory Budgeting Organization on campus held its second assembly of the semester on Nov. 9, where students brainstormed about how to spend the pot of money that’s been allocated to them for student-supported projects. Sal Asaro, a senior biology major, explained the process to newcomers.  A steering committee plans and facilitates the collection of student ideas. It helps students develop their ideas into proposals, from which the committee creates a ballot of capital projects. It then organizes a campus-wide vote on the proposed projects. The projects receiving the most votes that also fit within the committee’s budget are then funded by the college administration. For projects that are beyond…

  • News

    Participatory budgeting enters its second year at QC

    In its second full semester on campus, the Queens College Participatory Budgeting Steering Committee is focusing on longevity and stability. The Student Organization for Democratic Alternatives works with both the Student Association and the Queens College Association to ensure that a portion of student’s tuition funds are being allocated for the change they want to see on campus. Changes that students have lobbied for in the past include better Wi-Fi, more bike racks, and increased composting and recycling efforts on campus. Seniors William Novello and Tariq Chandni lead participatory budgeting at Queens College, and despite it being a new organization they believe they will continue to receive support from the…

  • News

    Voting for change at QC

    Participatory Budgeting at Queens College spent many months developing proposals to help improve Queens College. Now, students will vote on them at tables from April 18 to 21. Students will vote on 12 proposals worked on by the four committees—Sustainability, Accessibility, Technology and Buildings and Grounds. Students are each allowed to vote on a maximum of three ideas. They can vote at tables located in Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library, the Dining Hall and the Student Union. One popular proposal from the sustainability committee is adding more flowers on campus; specifically near the Colden Auditorium. Adding these flowers would cost an annual $2,500 to replace those already near the auditorium, and…

  • Editorials

    Our favorites for participatory budgeting at QC

    First, we need to congratulate Participatory Budgeting at QC. Getting ideas—let alone 12—for students to vote on is a major achievement and highlights just why activism is vital for students. The Knight News reviewed each of the 12 proposals that students will vote for from April 18 to April 21. We decided three ideas that students should vote for: composting, heating and air conditioners, and a stage ground for theater. Composting, for those unfamiliar, is turning organic material, like food, into soil. It’s found in nature, but it is done by people too. The idea would help Fitness, Nutrition and Exercise Science professor Claire Consiglio’s class. But it also keeps…

  • News

    Participatory budgeting begins at Queens College

    Participatory budgeting first began in 1989 in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Citizens voted on projects proposed by other residents. Projects with the most votes received funding. Since then, the practice was exported across the world from Spain to the United States. Starting this semester, participatory budgeting will begin at Queens College after students requested it. Participatory budgeting is democratic as a community creates ideas as projects. It chooses popular ideas and enacts it with available resources. Melissa Appleton, project manager at the Participatory Budgeting Project, said the organization she is with would help the process if any questions come up. “Participatory Budgeting Process is pleased to provide technical assistance to Participatory…