• Op-Eds

    What You May Have Overlooked in the VAWA

    Over the past years, the severity of domestic violence has finally been grasped by society. The transition of the understanding of domestic violence from household conflict to serious crime can be attributed to the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). The VAWA has been praised for its role in protecting victims and ensuring that abusers are punished. It ensures domestic violence crimes are properly investigated and implements mandatory arrest. Mandatory arrest means that a police officer is required to make an arrest when responding to a domestic violence dispute without a warrant or having witnessed the crime. This policy is to ensure that domestic violence crimes are not ignored. But could…

  • Op-Eds

    Improving Medicare’s Future

    On July 30, Medicare will celebrate its 51st anniversary. Before preparing the party and getting the cake, we must applaud the resilience and resourcefulness of the Medicare program for the past 51 years. Unfortunately, Medicare faces a financial problem that might result in changes to the program. The problem comes as the baby boomers retire and are living longer. There is ongoing fear that the government will run out of funding for Medicare, resulting in reduced money for current and future recipients. While funding is an issue, there is hope for the program. And that hope is called privatization. The current situation for the future Medicare. The Federal government have…

  • Op-Eds

    $10.74, the Living Wage Worth Fighting For

    Should persons working 40-hour work weeks earn enough to ensure they have an adequate standard of living? Of course, people should not be working for poverty wages. Hence, the government should take steps to raise the federal minimum wage to a practical level on which workers can live. In a nation as geographically diverse and expansive as the United States, the living wage, or the wage necessary to maintain an adequate standard of living within a community, varies widely from state to state, county to county, and even district to district. This has led to a wide spectrum of opinions on the topic, dividing the debate along and within party…

  • News

    Jose Vargas talks about the changing American identity

    In 2011, Jose Antonio Vargas, a Pulitzer Prize-winning filmmaker and journalist, made a risky decision—he came out as an undocumented immigrant.   He made this decision not only to liberate himself, but also use his status in media to make an impact on the immigration debate.   “I am really tired of being the minority, and I would argue that there is a new majority, a new mainstream. All of these people that we think are minority are moving together into a mainstream,” Vargas said.   Vargas spoke April 13 at Benjamin S. Rosenthal Library 230 about this and other immigration issues in the United States.   Vargas talked about…

  • News

    Music provides little understanding of wars post 9/11

    The relationship between war and music in the post 9/11 era is different than it was during the height of the Vietnam War. On April 28, Columbia University hosted an event called Soundtrack of War, which examined the parallels between music and the wars in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. Service Together, an organization that seeks to bridge the gap between veterans and civilians, organized the event. The music of the 1960’s gave listeners, present and future, an understanding of the conflict and politics of the time. The same cannot be said of the wars following 9/11. In terms of the war and the politics around it, veterans of Iraq and…