• News

    Historic march celebrates 50th anniversary

    On Aug. 28, 1963, a bus full of young people from Queens College’s student association and Congress of Racial Equality drove to Washington, D.C. to be a part of a movement, to be a part of something greater. “The general tone, particularly among young people was ‘hey the world’s changing and we can actually play a roll, we can make a difference,’” Mark Levy, QC SA President from 1962-1963, said. Between the Lincoln Memorial and the Washington Monument, around 200,000 people gathered to participate in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Levy, who is now special assistant to the president for the civil rights initiative and was a…

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    Queens College in the palm of your hand

    Phase Two of Queens College Mobile application has been released with additional features and services to bring students and faculty what they want and need with just a tap of their finger on a mobile device. “In essence, QC Mobile basically has information that students, faculty and staff would need in the palm of their hands,” Angel Arcelay, director of Enterprise Application Services said. “It keeps the students connected.” The new releases include browsing the library catalogs at QC and CUNY, receiving the latest news from The Knight News, following QC on Facebook and Twitter and for iOS users, exploring campus with augmented reality. Users of the application are able…

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    As demography shifts, Queens College won’t lower standards

    Amongst the competitive four-year colleges in the City University of New York, Queens College is home to many different cultures and ethnicities. However, competition can be an advantage and a disadvantage. The advantage comes with having some of the top students in the world attend the school, but with that, the ethnography of the students changes, leaving little variety. With a stricter admissions process, QC along with the other four-year colleges — Baruch, Brooklyn, City and Hunter College — have witnessed a shift in demography. When CUNY was first established in 1847 it was known as the Free Academy, providing higher quality education and making it accessible and affordable to…

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    Obama gets reelected: political science professors discuss what could come next

    In, what the entire nation expected to be a close race, President Barack Obama came out the victor, winning against Gov. Mitt Romney, for his second term in office. “How did this happen that Obama won? In the end it wasn’t even really close: 332 electoral votes! That’s more than the past presidents,” Professor Ron Hayduk said, at the presidential roundtable held on Nov. 14. Hayduk, along with fellow political science professor Michael Krasner, hosted the forum. Using facts and figures to show the direction voters took, the forum provided answers to the outcome of this year’s presidential election. With Obama being elected for his second term, the question remains:…

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    CUNY has class despite no gas, limited mass transit service after Sandy

    The phrase “the calm after the storm,” didn’t apply to many CUNY students who returned to classes on Friday, Nov. 2. After canceling all classes from Oct. 29 through Nov. 1, CUNY decided to open the doors of its campuses Friday despite the nearly impossible commuting conditions that were still felt days after Hurricane Sandy’s wrath. By the time students were supposed to return to school, transit problems weren’t completely fixed; many subways and buses ran on a limited schedule, some people were still without power in their homes and a gas shortage caused many people to wait on long lines. But CUNY decided to resume classes nonetheless. “I still…