Arts & Entertainment

Kosher sushi a hit at Sushi Toyko

Photo by Jake Cohen For Queens College students interested in sushi, Sushi Tokyo is a convenient choice. It's located at 67-25 Main Street.
Photo by Jake Cohen
For Queens College students interested in sushi, Sushi Tokyo is a convenient choice. It’s located at 67-25 Main Street.

A great sushi meal can provide a lesson on how to approach life and cuisine. Such simple ingredients, done with care, provide the highest level of excellence.

Sushi Tokyo, located near Queens College at 67-25 Main Street, is an authentic sushi experience—including its kosher items.

Other sushi restaurants feature electronic music that ruins the experience, but not Sushi Tokyo. Moreover, aside from shellfish, all the important parts to a great sushi meal make up what is kosher.

Emanuel Israel is a server at Sushi Tokyo, and enjoys working there. What’s his recommended dish for customers? The black pepper tuna.

“Customers leave saying that was the best sushi,” Israel said.

Israel explained it was difficult to notice a difference in kosher sushi versus non-kosher sushi.

“Aside from no shellfish, it tastes the same,” Israel said.

Sushi Tokyo offers fish-served nigiri style, which is individual slices of fish molded onto an oval of cooked vinegar rice.

Eating a few assorted pieces nigiri style gives anyone a good indication of the quality of a sushi restaurant. It includes the two most important staples on the menu—the rice and the fish.

The rice was fresh and the fish was not cold. The surprise of the meal was the smoked tuna with its rich, smoky flavor and oily like lox, a kind of salmon usually mixed with cream cheese on a bagel.

The sushi portion of the meal was reasonably priced at $11.95, not including the 15 percent discount CUNY students receive during lunch hours.

The sushi was fantastic. But not so much for the dessert. While not awful, mediocrity never won anyone a medal.

The fried ice cream with its decent tempura batter crust was not as bad as its $8.95 price tag.

Aside from that, the salmon, tuna, striped bass, smoked tuna and yellow tail are among the choices of fish at Sushi Tokyo. This gives anyone an incentive to come back and try other types of fish.

Jonathan Ross, a Flushing native and sushi enthusiast, swears by the Coney roll that is spicy salmon, avocado and spicy kani or crab meat. He lists Sushi Tokyo among his regular spots in his takeout rotation.

Ross did not eat sushi for months because his wife was pregnant and could not eat any. Now, he is celebrating both his child and ability to eat sushi again.

“I’m happy to have a newborn baby,” Ross said. “And eating sushi again.”

When opening up the menu at Sushi Tokyo, the restaurant vows to bring “unsurpassed” sushi to the kosher market. Based on the reaction of customers and its delicious sushi, the restaurant is doing well in that mission.

Kosher and non-kosher sushi fans alike will enjoy Sushi Tokyo. Just don’t ask for any soft shell crab or sea urchin.

Jake Cohen

Jake is a Long Island native with an encyclopedic knowledge of Chris Claremont's run on X-Men and other useless pop culture trivia. In his spare time he enjoys puppies, kitties, and sandwiches.

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